Help GuideProduct Information Site Maps & Building MapsComparison: Site Maps vs Vector Site Maps

Comparison: Site Maps vs Vector Site Maps

The image and article explain the differences between a Site Map and a Vector Site Map. 

Similarities

Both the standard and the vector site maps contain roads, amenities, parking, building numbers and locations. The map will visually distinguish property features such as your clubhouse, pool, leasing office, dog park, and major natural features. Each map also includes attractive design details such as vehicles, a North-oriented compass icon, trees, walking paths, and water features. 

An unlimited number of changes can be made until final approval. Turnaround time is the same for both styles. The files you receive include a JPG image file for the web and a PDF file for print.

Differences

Here's a short summary of how standard Site Maps differ from Vector Site Maps:

  • Though it is a two-dimensional image, a standard Site Map is designed in a 3D application so that it has much more depth, contrast, vibrant colors, and detail. By contrast, a Vector Site Map is published with an architectural drafting application and consequently has a simple, conventional, and illustrative appearance.
  • A standard Site Map is a rendering that we provide in a raster/pixel file format. A Vector Site Map is published in a vector file format so that the resolution of the image features remain clear no matter the level of zoom used in viewing the image.
  • After choosing and designing a style, it isn't possible to convert it to the other style. If it is necessary to change the style, then the map will need to be reproduced in the other style (a conversion fee will apply).

Details for each map style below: The image at the top of the article contrasts the visual differences in the map styles. Continue reading below to learn more about each map style.

Site Map

Each Site Map is designed with a unique three-dimensional appearance to represent the details of your property and clearly highlight all amenities. 

A Site Map is published in two file formats:

  • 1,280 pixel-width JPG image. The height of the web file is determined by the size of the map. This image is ready for immediate inclusion in your Internet listings, websites, and emails.
  • A PDF file that has a print resolution of 4,000+ pixels, which is ready for immediate inclusion in brochures, advertisements, and office displays. While desktop computer printing is possible, we recommend hiring a professional printer.

The image below is an example of a Site Map, which is much more complex and rich in detail than a Vector Site Map. Download example web and print files for a Site Map here

Learn all the details about the design process and requirements in the Site Maps article.

Poster file: A poster-resolution file is available at no additional cost. Since no property is the same as another, the size of your poster may need adjustment fit the width and height of your specific site map.

Vector Site Map

A Vector Site Map is designed in vector-graphics format, which can be zoomed in very closely without losing crisp edges on the features of the map. The Vector Site Map provides a relatively simple presentation of amenities to guide residents and serve as a showcase for prospects. 

A Vector Site Map image is much smaller in size to an equivalent Site Map image, so it will load faster onto the device of your website visitors.

A Vector Site Map is published in two file formats:

  • 1,920 pixel-width JPEG image (2K). The height of the web file is determined by the size of the map. This image is ready for immediate inclusion in your Internet listings, websites, and email messages.
  • A vector PDF file that is displayable at any resolution. This file is ready for immediate inclusion in brochures, advertisements, office displays, and desktop computer printing.

The figure below is one example of a Vector Site Map, which isn't as complex as a Site Map. Download example web and print files for a Vector Site Map here.

Learn all the details about the design process and requirements in the Vector Site Maps article.